The Order Of The Magi

The very beginning of The Order of The Magi in Manchester 1909

The Order of The Magi is one of the oldest magical societies in the U.K. and has an extensive archive of historical documents dating back to the establishment of the society in 1909.

Members of The Order of The Magi stood outside The Deansgate Hotel, Manchester
(date circa 1909-1914)

Here is a article published in “Wizard Magazine” about inaugural meeting of The Order of The Magi just 1 month after it’s founding:

A Manchester Magical Society

A month ago Mr. G.W. Panter, M.A. (Member of Inner Magic Circle) conceived the idea of forming a Magical Society for Manchester and district.

With this end in view, he arranged with Mr. Waite, magic dealer, of Peter Street, Manchester, to display a notice asking all those willing to join to give in their names.

As a result of this, on the 11th inst. a most enthusiastic meeting was held at the “Cities Hotel,” Deansgate, Manchester, at which about 30 conjurers attended.

It was decided to form a Magical Society, and Mr. G.W. Panter, M.A. was unanimously elected President, Mr. Waite, Hon. Treasurer and Librarian, and Mr. T.H. Halsall, Junr., Hon Sec. (pro tem.).

Mr. Panter spoke about the objects of a magical society, and referred to the success of the British Magical Society, and the Magic Circle; he also read a very interesting letter which he had received from Mr. Fred Walker (Hon. Sec. of the B.M.S.), wishing the new society every success.

Mr. T.H Halsall, Junr, (Hon. Sec.) also read several letters from conjurers anxious to join., but, owing to engaements, unable to attend the meeting.

Speeches were given by Mr. Fredrick W. Collins, Mr. L.M. Varney, Mr. Waite, Mr. Thomas French, Mr. Wildman, Mr. Ritherdon, Mr. J.W. Riley, and others, who all spoke as to the advisability of working together.

Business being suspended, Mr. A. Buckle obliged with a few card tricks, introducing a very pleasing and novel effect by fanning a quantity of cards and making them grow smaller, and finally disappear, bringing them back again to their original position, electing a round of applause for this clever sleight.

Mr J.W. Riley then being called upon gave a monologue, entitled “Oh Memory” in which the speech and mannerisms of an old man were portrayed to the letter.

Mr. Sugden then gave a recital from “The Merchant of Venice,” the rendering of which proved him to be a talented artist.

Mr. E. Wilburt gave the passing of 12 cards from hand to pocket, which as an example of Digital Dexterity left nothing to be desired.

Mr. T.H. Halsall Junr., then presented the passing of coins from left hand to tumbler held in right hand; he proved himself to be a master of coins, and Mr. Whitehead showed no mean ability with cards in the Four Ace Trick.

A few of those present gave their experiences with children in the course of entertaining, which were very amusing.

A meeting of the Council was arranged for the 13th inst., at which Mr Halsall, on account of business, wished to resign the secretaryship, and Mr. J.W. Riley, being asked to take the position (subject to the sanction of the members) decided to accept.

Anyone interested in magic residing in Manchester district, and wishing to join the society, are kindly requested to send in their names to the Hon. Sec., J.W. Riley, De Mcglio, Eccles, Manchester

Edwin Hooper & The Supreme Magic Company’s Rainbow House Rabbit Production

Few professional magicians in the U.K. can deny that they have heard of “The Supreme Magic Company”. It is doubtful there are more than a handful of those who grew up reading the company magazine “The Magigram” or carefully reading through the thousands of effects for sale in their extensive catalogues, that haven’t heard of Edwin Hooper – founder of The Supreme Magic Company, and inventor of many tricks.

One of Edwin and Supreme’s most iconic magical effects had to be “The Rainbow House”. There couldn’t have been many Children’s Entertainers who didn’t own, or long to own this fantastic “mini-illusion”.

The Effect

For those who don’t know the trick, whilst presentations would vary, the effect went along these lines. The performer would display a large model of a white house with black line details. A sort of 3D version of the illustrations found in colouring books.

This would then be placed inside a square tube bearing a colourful rainbow motif. Then the magician would use his favourite colouring routine by-play. Perhaps using a number of coloured silks which when placed into a bag would magically turn white, or one of the various other colour effects sold by Supreme.

Eventually the tube would be lifted to reveal that the model house was now brightly painted!

If this wasn’t magical enough, it was then time to find out who lived in such a small house. On lifting the house, a live rabbit would be shown to have appeared!

All in all it was a fantastic effect, and a great show closer for many magicians around the country. But why are we sharing this today?

It has come to light recently that Edwin Hooper first discussed his ideas for The Rainbow House at a magic lecture in Manchester for Order of The Magi in 1984, as mentioned in this website’s text. I wonder if on that evening, 35 years ago, he (or any of the magicians who attended) had any idea how popular and iconic the trick would become?