Magician

A History of Magic in Manchester

The article below, written by the Order of the Magi’s past editor Bayard Grimshaw, has been reproduced from “Magi Magoria” published by Supreme Magic in 1974, and covers a very brief history of Magic in Manchester and of course the Order of the Magi – one of the oldest societies for performing magicians in the world, up until the publication date.

Perhaps, one day, our current members could put together a further article dealing with the history of Magic in Manchester from 1974 to the present date…


MAGIC IN MANCHESTER

(Not just we Magi but also)

BAYARD GRIMSHAW


Understandably, the origins of Magic are obscure and a matter for speculation. We may assume that among our remote ancestors, as far back as the beginnings of community life, there came to the fore the “wise men”, those whose special knowledge of natural principles enabled them to keep a step ahead of the rest and to astound their fellows by their ability to bring about strange and awe-inspiring results. They would use their power for the common good, or for personal prestige, and perhaps – who knows ? – to amuse and entertain, too.


The first written record of a magical performance as we understand the term today was contained In the Westcar Papyrus, the present whereabouts of which are in doubt: it described a display of Magic given by one Dedi, at the court of King Cheops in Egypt nearly six thousand years ago. Of the precise achievements of the Magi of the Ancient East we know little, though their reputation as wonder-workers has come down to us over the years, and inspired the title of the Order of the Magi.


Of Magic as entertainment during the centuries of the Greek and Roman civilisations we have ample evidence. A Greek writer of the third century has left us a detailed description of a performance of the sleight-of-hand feat known as the Cups and Balls, which, he wrote, “rendered me almost speechless and made me gape with surprise”; the routine he described might pass for one of the present day. Seneca, the great Roman philosopher, wrote of the same feat, and sensibly, wise man that he was, added: “If I get to know how a trick is done, I lose my interest in it”. In those days it was done with round white pebbles and wine-cups, and it was from the name of the latter that the performer came to be known by the Romans as an “acetabularius”.


So it is plausible to assume that the soldiers who garrisoned the Roman fort of Mamucium on the banks of the Irwell may well have been entertained, at times when the rude Brigantes ceased from troubling, by gifted comrades or by itinerant acetabularii. To their days, the first century A.D., we can ascribe the probable beginnings of Magic in Manchester.


As a centre of trade the city must have attracted, especially on market days, many of the travelling “jugglers” who made their way from town to town from the eighth to the sixteenth centuries. Probably such performers as Banks and Richardson in the seventeenth century, and Fawkes, Pinchbeck, Yeates, Comus and Jonas in the early eighteenth, visited Manchester, for they are known to have toured the provinces. Breslaw, the German who achieved such success in England, certainly appeared here several times between 1773 and 1782; so, almost certainly, did Katterfelto and probably too the illustrious Pinetti.


By the time we come to the nineteenth century we have more precise information. Ingleby visited Manchester in 1808; Philippe (Talon) in 1839, Dobler in 1842; the famed Anderson, the “Wizard of the North,” in 1838-39 and again in 1841; Jacobs in 1850 and probably earlier, between 1834 and 1838; while Buck had a “record run” of a hundred consecutive nights in Manchester in 1851. The first Bosco was here about 1857, and Frikell in 1858.


But one instance of Magic in Manchester, looking back a century or so, stands out above the rest: that visit of Robert-Houdin, “father of modern magic”, to the Theatre Royal in 1848. An original playbill, announcing the event, is a treasured possession of the Order of the Magi, and is handed into the care of each new President on the occasion of his installation. “The theatre in this city is immense”, wrote Robert-Houdin in his Memoirs: “It can hold an entire people … Twelve hundred spectators scarcely filled the pit”. And he goes on to devote seven pages to an account of his successful first night.


And so we come to the years of the great illusionists, all of whom visited Manchester on many occasions and attracted huge audiences to the numerous theatres of the city and its surrounding districts. Manchester was not only a stronghold of entertainment but a place of theatrical stores and workshops, the centre of the great Broadhead Tour; it was said that one could lodge in Rumford Street or Brunswick Street and do a year’s work on the halls, travelling back to one’s “digs” each night by tramcar.


The latter years of the last century, and the first decades of the present, were a golden age of Magic; the art, ever popular with the entertainment-loving public, flourished as never before. Most variety bills had their magician, be he merely a front-cloth act with no more of a repertoire than a few card sleights; but the princes of the profession were those who toured a full show, with their lavish publicity and their own scenery, their regiments of well-trained assistants, their floating ladies and their vanishing ladies and their incredible productions and transpositions.


Hartz, Servais Le Roy, Rameses; Devant, Carl Hertz, De Biere, Lingha Singh; Lafayette, Chung Ling Soo, Houdini, Goldin, The Great Carmo – their names spelt glamour and mystery. Their interviews appeared in the press, articles about them in the weekly and monthly magazines. Their advent to a local theatre, heralded by intriguing posters on the hoardings, aroused delicious anticipation: one could hardly wait for the week to come. And their mysteries provided ample material for speculation and discussion for weeks afterwards.


We must not forget that alongside of these “greats” flourished the lesser lights of the concert and the children’s party, the ladies’ evening, the soiree and the conversazione. Such were the majority of the founders and early members of the Order of the Magi. They basked in the limelight touched off by their more famous elder brethren, they were in great demand and their date books were full.


Came the time when the variety theatres reeled under the successive blows of the silent cinema and the “talkies”, radio and eventually television; when recording “stars” topped the bills in the larger of what few Hippodromes and Palaces survived, “strip” shows the smaller, leaving scant space for the stage magician. For a while Dante, Kalanag, Lyle, Murray, Levante and a few more tried to keep alive the tradition of the big magical show in this country. But in the end it was largely left to the magical societies to keep Magic alive.


At the turn of the century magicians from all over the world, and local magicians in particular, amateur and professional, little-known and well known, used to foregather on Sunday afternoons and evenings at the home of Harry Whiteley at 86 Medlock Street. Mr. Whiteley, performer, author and magical dealer, had countless friends in Magic; he was British correspondent of ‘The Sphinx’, the great American magical monthly. Famous illusionists, touring the provinces, would when possible break their journeys in Manchester in order to spend an hour or two at Harry Whiteley’s; others, working within travelling distance, would come over just for the pleasure of spending a short time with kindred spirits.


Such a one was Chung Ling Soo (W.E. Robinson). Believed by all save those in the know to be genuinely Chinese, he was actually born in America, of Scottish ancestry; but he seemed to have a special affection for Manchester, where he had many friends, and for many years he had a store and workshop at Bolton, where his colleague Ritherdon designed and made much of his elaborate apparatus and scenery.


These informal gatherings led to the formation of an equally informal society, “The Friends of Magic;” Soo was the President. Though this association did not directly lead to the formation of the Order of the Magi, it no doubt had an indirect influence, and it was, as far as we know, the first banding together of magicians in the Manchester area.


It was probably at Harry Whiteley’s house that G. W. Panter, M. A. , a keen student of magic a member of the recently formed Magic Circle, met fellow conjurors and, realising their strength, saw the desirability of forming in Manchester a more formally constituted society. At first he consulted with the Council of the Magic Circle, with a view to instituting a northern branch of that body; this was found, for several reasons, to be impracticable. And so, emboldened by news of the success of two magical societies in the U.S.A. , the Society of American Magicians and the Detroit Circle, and two in England, the British Magical Society in Birmingham and the Northern Magical Society – now long defunct – in Liverpool, as well as the Magic Circle itself, Mr. Panter embarked upon the formation of a new society altogether.


An advertisement was placed in the local papers, and a notice displayed in Waite’s magic-shop-cum-barber’s in Peter Street near to the old Tivoli Theatre, inviting those interested to meet on the 11th March, 1909, at the Cities Hotel, Deansgate. About thirty conjurors attended; support was assured, and with enthusiasm the new Society was duly formed. Mr. Panter was elected President; Mr. Waite became Treasurer and Librarian; and Mr. T. H. Halsall was the first Secretary. On second thoughts he found that he could not spare the necessary time, and two days later he was succeeded by J. W. Riley (“De Meglio”), a well-known performer who managed Wiles’ conjuring department and entertainment bureau for many years.


Among those present was a young man named Ronald Bumby, who became President in 1967 and is still happily with us in 1977.


Business being concluded, there was an impromptu entertainment. The first trick, Diminishing and Vanishing Cards, was shown by dear old Arthur Buckle, a well-loved member who became President in 1947 and remained active until his death in 1954; another performer was Mr. Halsall, President from 1936 to 1946, who, the report says, “proved himself to be a master of coins”.


The as yet unnamed society promised well from the start. At the next meeting probably inspired by President Panter, the title “The Order of the Magi”, a happy choice, was decided upon. The Order was fortunate in having among its members an artist and process engraver, Mr. Holmes, and a printer, Mr. Wildman; so well-designed letter-headings and programmes were readily available. During the first year several open meetings and a Ladies’ Evening were held; among the performers were Brothers Ron Bumby and Charles Meyer. A badge was designed and made, and a library was started.


The first issue of “The Magi”, the Order’s monthly journal, is dated the first of May, 1910. It consisted of two pages of duplicated typescript, and R. Mervyn Varney, a popular entertainer, was the first Editor. A few months later he was taken ill, and he died in July, 1911. Early issues mention visits from Max Sterling, Servais Le Roy, and The Great Raymond, who later became a member; meetings were held at the Deansgate Hotel, and special events at Hime and Addison’s Concert Rooms. Brother Holmes designed a printed heading for the journal; it survived unchanged until 1950 when “The Magi” attained the dignity of print. It was a year later that H. Albiston Gee entered upon his long and distinguished editorship.


To recount even a drastically condensed history of the Order over the following years would fill a sizeable volume. Some day, perhaps it can be set down. Even to list the names of those great magicians who became members and honorary officers would take up more space than we have at our present command: Nevil Maskelyne, Servais Le Roy, Max Sterling, Horace Goldin, Chris Van Bern, De Biere, Victor Farelli, Chung Ling Soo, Professor Hoffman, David Devant and Harry Houdini come to mind, while almost everyone else of note visited meetings or corresponded.


And so The Order of the Magi flourished through the years, to reach its Golden Jubilee in 1959. This important landmark in its history was celebrated fittingly by a Jubilee Banquet at the Midland Hotel, attended by civic dignitaries and followed by a notable after-dinner entertainment; a Festival of Magic at the Lesser Free Trade Hall, open to the public, which attracted large audiences for a full week; two “magicians only” events, a session of close-up table magic and a free-and-easy type of show, which were attended by visiting magicians from far and wide; and perhaps most noteworthy of all, an Exhibition of “Magic Through the Ages” at the Central Library, undoubtedly the finest display of its kind which has ever been staged anywhere in the world, which still holds two unbroken records, for total attendance and length of run.


Meeting places have changed over the years: the Order has always lacked a permanent home, though in our present Headquarters at Hulme, only a short distance from the city centre, we are fortunate in having excellent facilities. Presidents, Secretaries, Treasurers, Editors have come and gone, though with less frequency than one might expect, for the Order has been fortunate in its officers and their devotion to their duties.


Members too have come and gone, but here again we have been fortunate. The high standards which have marked the Order of the Magi since its inception in 1909 have been maintained by the recruitment of new members to fill the places of those lost to us through the advancing years. The quality and enthusiasm of some of those recruited in recent years was shown by the formation of an Action Committee, which among other innovations has brought about the publication of the book now in your hands; another fine achievement, in June 1976, was an “At Home” day, “A Day with the Magi”, held at our Headquarters. Attended by many magicians from other societies, this was an unqualified success.


The programme included a Children’s Show, two Lectures, a session of Close-Up Magic, two Exhibitions, showing the “History of the Magi” and the “History of Playing-Cards”, a Dealers’ Hall in which four magical dealers were represented, and a great Gala Show. And the noteworthy feature of the day was that every performer, each of the lecturers, all of the workers behind and before the scenes – and even one of the four dealers – was one of our own members. How many other magical societies could attempt so comprehensive an event, to so high a standard, without calling on outside assistance?


One word more: the Order of the Magi can proudly claim three records, uncommon amongst societies of any kind. We have never failed to hold a monthly meeting; we have never failed to publish our monthly journal; and we have never suffered a schism.


For 68 years, through two world wars and immense changes in the social structure, the Order has gone from strength to strength. So long as it can march confidently forward to its Centenary in the year 2009, and beyond, so long will there be Magic in Manchester.


Our Top Tips for Blackpool Magic Convention

Blackpool Magic Convention is just a few days away now, and many members from The order of The Magi will be travelling from Manchester to Blackpool to enjoy the packed schedule of shows, lectures, and more that is on offer at the world’s biggest magic convention.

Every February, 4,000+ magicians descend on “The Vegas of The North” for a long weekend of magical fun at The Winter Gardens. With three days of wizardry, plus an auction of magic tricks and books, it is the event of the year for magicians.

So what are our top tips for Blackpool Magic Convention?

Wrap up warm, and wear comfy shoes!

Blackpool is in the north of England, and is a seaside resort. It’s likely to be cold, and windy. Whilst all the activities this year take place inside the Winter Gardens, the chances are you won’t be sleeping there, and you will be on your feet for quite some time over the weekend. Take a warm jacket / coat (preferably waterproof) and wear shoes that are comfortable.

Plan your Schedule!

There is so much going on over the weekend, that you are likely to be spoilt for choice. And it would be impossible for the organisers to arrange a schedule that allows everyone to see everything throughout the weekend. We estimate that the convention would need to be on for at least 7 days, to make this possible!

Thankfully the organisers have released a free smartphone app, with a full schedule of the shows, lectures, and more, so you can plan your weekend in advance. It is worthwhile checking out the lists of activities, and if you are not sure whether a lecture or show is going to be “your thing” you can always check out the long list of artistes in the app.

You can download the Official iPhone App Here
And the Google App Here

It doesn’t finish when the Winter Gardens Shuts…

Whilst the events stat at around 9am and go on throughout the day until midnight or later, there is always more magic to be found. Many magicians meet up each night in the bar of their B&Bs to chat about the day, show each other tricks, and socialise.

However, there is one place that is famous for Magic in Blackpool during the weekend of the convention – The Ruskin Hotel – where hundreds, possibly thousands of magicians will gather after the convention finishes, to enjoy several more hours of magic, mentalism and the occasional beer! Be warned – it will be extremely busy, but it is worth the visit.

Don’t forget to Eat & Sleep!

We don’t want to sound like your parents, but…

It’s a long weekend with lots of beer flowing, and some very late nights. Whilst you might want to try and be the last person in the hotel bar at 6am, don’t forget that you will need some sleep… and food. It would be a shame to miss a day of the convention because you are catching up on sleep after a very wild night.

Similarly, you aren’t going to get the most out of the weekend if you don’t eat. Thankfully Blackpool has plenty of cafes, restaurants, takeaways, and pasty shops, catering for almost everyone.

Take your Time in the Dealers Hall

We’ve all done it! Wandered around the 150+ magic dealers, and bought something on impulse, only to regret it almost straight afterwards. The dealers are there for the full three days, and most will have plenty of stock with them. Walk around, have a look, watch the demos, and ask questions. Just because you have watched a dealer demonstrate a magic trick, don’t feel that you should have to buy it immediately.

Take some time to consider if you will really use that trick; If it is suitable for you, and your act; or if it will end up in that drawer of unused props. Talk to other magicians and get their advice, and even check out reviews of the effect on sites like The Magic Cafe.

Dealers know that many magicians won’t buy a magic trick until they have walked around the dealers hall at least once. Some magicians won’t buy anything until the Sunday afternoon.

Waiting until Sunday can be a gamble though – sometimes effects that have been advertised as “limited quantity” might sell out early on at the convention. But the flip side is that one or two dealers will reduce their prices on certain items on the Sunday afternoon, just to save them taking stock back with them.

And don’t forget that the dealers are situated around the convention – including the Horseshoe, and Balcony!

Don’t forget your Photo ID!

The organisers of Blackpool Magic Convention are insisting that anyone with a pre-booked ticket presents photo ID on arrival. According to their (very useful) Facebook page, Driving Licences, Passports, Bus Passes, and Work IDs are all acceptable, as long as the name on the ID matches the name on the ticket. This of course might cause issues for those who booked their tickets using their stage names without thought.

Leave the Fire Wallet in your Pocket!

Yes, it’s a magic convention. Yes, it’s a weekend of fun. Yes, we all get excited about Blackpool…

But the poor bar maid who is trying to serve 50+ magicians at the bar is really not going to be impressed when a wallet bursts into flames as a magician pays for their beer! The chances are, she, and every other barstaff in the town will be subjected to fire wallets at least 100 times every day!

Save them the pain, and let them get on with serving someone else who is desperate for a drink.

You know who would like to see a trick? Other magicians…

No matter what your level of experience, don’t be afraid to watch other magicians perform at the convention, and elsewhere, and to show a favourite trick or two of your own. Bar Staff, and Hotel Receptionists might not appreciate lots of magic (but if they ask to see a trick, feel free!), but your fellow magicians will.

You can learn something from any lecture

A big part of the convention is the wide range of lectures that have been arranged. If you find yourself with some spare time, go and see an extra lecture – even if it is about an area of magic that you wouldn’t usually focus on. There is always something you can learn from the masters of their craft.

And whilst we are on the subject of lectures… please don’t sit through a lecture riffling playing cards or messing about on your phone. It can be distracting for others!

Stuff to pack that you might not have thought about

No doubt you’ve already considered taking the usual things – clothes, wash kit, mobile phone, wallet, cash card etc. Here a a few items you might not have considered yet…

  • Pain Killers (for the morning after a night in the Ruskin)
  • Bottled Water (great for the hotel room)
  • Pot Noodles (again, a great addition to the hotel room when you realise you haven’t eaten all day, and it is 3am)
  • Phone Power Bank (is your phone’s battery really going to last all day?)
  • Hand Sanitizer
  • Throat Sweets & Mints
  • An Extra Pack of Cards
  • Quality Toilet Roll (a must when travelling for our webmaster!)
  • Pen & Paper (for making notes at magic lectures, jotting down items you’ve seen in the dealers hall etc)

Enjoy The Magic of Blackpool

It is a long weekend, with lots going on… and if this is your first time going to Blackpool Magic Convention, you are going to love it!

Enjoy the magic!

And if you see a member of The Order of The Magi, say hello!

Useful Links

The Blackpool Magic Convention Website

The Blackpool Magic Convention Facebook Page

The Blackpool Magic Convention Attendees Facebook Group

A Magical Joke

An amateur magician accidentally turns his wife into a sofa and his two kids into armchairs. He starts to panic.

He tries every trick in the book but none work so, in desperation, he decides to take them to hospital. Once at the hospital, the magician spends a sleepless night while the medical staff run numerous tests on the unfortunate woman and children.

Finally, the head doctor comes out into the corridor to speak to the magician. “How are my family?” he asks worriedly, “Are they alright?”

The doctor replies, “they’re comfortable…”

John Archer Lecture – Manchester, April 2017

The Helen Moran Memorial Lecture this year took place on 25th April and was presented by John Archer. There was a good turn- out of members and visitors and included Peter Moran.

Helen Moran Photo

Helen Moran was a much respected honorary member of The Order of The Magi, who worked very hard behind the scenes. When Helen sadly passed away, she kindly left a bequest to provide the first magic lecture of the Society’s year.

I last saw John at South Tyneside a few weeks ago as a performer and it was great to see a lecture where he showed not only how his effects were achieved but how to and where to obtain the laughs. By the use of various methods he illustrated how a magician screws up can be turned into a positive result with hilarious consequences.

He went on to show the envelope routine that fooled Penn and Teller and brought him a trip to Las Vegas. It was indeed clever thinking and one can understand why they were fooled!

His coincidence routine with a very attention grabbing story was simplicity in modus operandi, but needed presentation work to achieve the right angle. Apart from two decks of cards all it needed was some ******** (you should have been there) and you were off.

His dog pet name was a much improved and simplified working of an effect he has demonstrated at a previous lecture and now a lot stronger.

A mind reading routine of a chosen celebrity went down well.

A routine with ESP cards was another hit. All routines were described in great detail with all the pauses and asides clearly shown. Yes, I can understand why this man fooled Penn and Teller!
On your behalf I would like to thank Peter for continuing the sponsorship to keep in our minds all the hard work and massive input Helen Moran put into this society.

Report by Geoff Newton

(Webmaster Note: Parts of this report, which features in full in the members’ only Magi Magazine, have been edited to keep John’s methods secret. For full explanations, we recommend that you speak to John Archer directly, who will be able to advise which of his lecture note packs contain the relevant tricks)

 

 

The Order of The Magi Christmas Party 2016

The IBM British Ring President goes to The Order of The Magi Christmas Party

After a gruesome journey of roadworks and long delays on the motorway we arrived at the Irish World Heritage Centre in Manchester. This palatial venue with panoramic views over the city was the ideal location for a party.

As we arrived midst a general knowledge quiz which appeared to be very popular with the 60 or so guests present, we were formally introduced to President Alan Johnston who made us very welcome and was charming throughout the evening. Being in Manchester the meal was Lancashire hotpot which was delicious with good helpings all round. After this British Ring President Clive Moore drew the raffle in a humorous way.

Next, the cabaret, a delightful young couple Jez Mansfield and Emma, his started with a silent magical janitor act featuring the empty box routine which then produced Emma. After this Jez did some nice patter card work in a light hearted manner. The act was rounded off by the singing talents of Emma sat at the piano, with many songs she had written herself.

Next Geoff Newton introduced Bunny Holly and the Cricket Bats, a comedy stint featuring Mark Sharples dressed as a giant Rabbit.

The whole evening was a great success, very friendly and well organised Mike Sharples and Geoff Newton had done an excellent job throughout the whole evening hosting and compèring the event.

Jean Ellison

The 100th Birthday Party Show

The 100th Birthday Party Show – 11th March 2009

by Geoffrey Newton, Public Relations Officer
An event like this, which of course only happens every one hundred years, has to be something special and it certainly was. “Team-Magi” certainly pulled out all the stops to make this a most memorable occasion. Continue reading

Magi Annual Dinner – 24th March 2006

Wow what a lovely evening. Where shall I start? At the beginning of the rainbow I think. We were welcomed into the Irish Centre with an overhead rainbow leading us into the dining hall which looked fantastic. Each table adorned with a golden pot and chocolate coins with cleverly created rainbows reaching upwards with the table number and pretty themed balloons swaying above. Continue reading

Manchester’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade 2006

Manchester’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade – 12th February 2006

On a freezing cold Sunday morning in Manchester, members of The Order of the Magi, their wives, partners, families and supporters could be found battling the wintry conditions to support Manchester’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

Manchester has hosted the UK’s largest parade for a number of years now and 2006 was no different. Continue reading